Conflict in Jammu and Kashmir

Publication Type:

Backgrounders

Source:

NIAS, Volume B6, Number 978-81-87663-93-5, Bangalore (2011)

URL:

http://eprints.nias.res.in/293/

Abstract:

The years of armed conflict in Jammu and Kashmir have claimed the lives of tens of thousands of people, and also wounded and displaced several thousands more. The pain of this violence was seen on the national stage through specific incidents such as the kidnapping of Rubia Syed, the daughter of then Union Home Minister in 1989, followed by the killing of H. L. Khera, general manager of Hindustan Machine Tools and Musheer-ul-Haq, vicechancellor of University of Kashmir in 1990. The armed rebels did not even spare the religious places. The economic costs too have been devastating. Underlying this continuous upheaval is a number of issues. ISSUES 1. Accession to India The most contentious issue and one that has been a subject of international attention is the accession of Jammu and Kashmir to India after Partition in 1947. Pakistan has continued to maintain that it should have become its territory since it had a Muslim majority and also alleged that the then ruler was pressurised to accede to India. It also accused India of violating the commitment to hold a plebiscite on its future. On the other side, India insisted that the accession was completely valid and accused Pakistan of forcefully occupying parts of the state. India also maintained that since Jammu and Kashmir is an integral and inalienable part of the country there can be no question of negotiating on the question of its accession. The dispute continues to be the key stumbling block in the relations between the two neighbours. For Pakistan it is the core issue in its relationship with India. New Delhi maintains that the matter has already been settled, and the more important issue is that of Pakistan of promoting insurgency and terrorism in India, especially in Jammu and Kashmir.

Notes:

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