NIAS Wednesday Discussion: "Graphical Representations of Characters in the Ramayana and its Ideological Effects on Viewers" by Pritha Chakraborty, JRD Tata Auditorium, NIAS, 0930 hrs

NIAS Wednesday Discussion

 

 

“Graphical Representations of Characters in the Ramayana and its Ideological Effects on Viewers”

                                                                          

Speaker:

Pritha Chakraborty

Research Associate, Gifted Education Team, NIAS

 prithachakraborty28@gmail.com 

                                   

Chairperson: Shalini Dixit, Assistant Professor, School of Social Sciences, NIAS, shalinidixit3@gmail.com  

             

31st January 2018, 9.30 am, Lecture Hall, NIAS

 

Abstract:  Mythologies are an integral part of the cultural heritage of nations all around the world.  These mythologies circulate throughout generations resulting in their acceptance as cultural ‘truths’.  Media plays a very important role in the transmission and popularization of these mythical tales.  The tales also propagate gender stereotyping by sketching women in two opposing garbs: the ideal; serene, docile, child-bearing (preferably a male child), asexual, modest woman and the abhorred; wild, outgoing, voluptuous, sexually precocious, barren woman.  Women characters are often pitted against each other through the descriptions of their body parts and the way of their clothing.  One can find in this kind of narratology that a certain segment of humanity has to undergo severe discrimination both on the basis of race and gender in order to create an ‘ideal’.The paper specifically deals with visual representations of characters in the Ramayana and how it is attributing to stereotypes.  The characterizations in the graphic novels and other visual media seem to rely much on the body and colors to differentiate between the good and the evil.  The problem with these types of characterization arises when children begin attributing the stereotypes in their day to day lives either consciously or unconsciously.  Hence, it is necessary to sensitize both the audience as well as the creative artists in order to prevent such stereotyped notions to cloud the holistic development of children.

 About the Speaker: Pritha Chakraborty is a Research Associate in the Gifted Education Team, NIAS.  She holds her M.A in English and Comparative Literature from Pondicherry University. 

  

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For further info, please contact Sangeetha Menon [prajnanata@gmail.com or smenon@nias.iisc.ernet.in] Coordinator of NIAS Wednesday Discussion Meetings

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Date: 
Wednesday, January 31, 2018