NIAS Wednesday Discussion: "To Feed or Not to Feed: Will People Stop Provisioning to Reduce Human-Monkey Conflict?" by Paula Pebsworth, Lecture Hall, NIAS, 1600 hrs

NIAS Wednesday Discussion

 

 

Topic:              To Feed or Not to Feed: Will People Stop Provisioning

                        to Reduce Human-Monkey Conflict?

                         

Speaker:          Paula Pebsworth

                        Post-Doctoral Associate, Animal Behavior and Cognition Programme, NIAS

                        paula.pebsworth@gmail.com

                                   

Chairperson:     Sindhu Radhakrishna

                        Professor and Dean, School of Natural and Engineering Sciences, NIAS

                        sindhu.radhakrishna@gmail.com

 

Date:               06th June, 2018

 

Time:              4.00 pm

 

Venue:            Lecture Hall, NIAS

 

All are cordially invited

 

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Abstract:  Monkeys move about human-dominated landscapes seemingly devoid of natural food for them. Our hearts tell us that the compassionate thing to do is to feed them. This concept is reinforced by religious pundits who claim that the way to resolve conflict and uncertainty in one’s life is by feeding wildlife – monkeys in particular. However, is this the best thing for humans and animals?

 

Wildlife biologists tell us that by feeding animals you increase: population size, the transmission of disease, dependence on humans, and conflict. Therefore, our minds tell us that the logical thing to do is not feed animals. It is clear to primatologists that feeding monkeys exacerbates conflict and should be discouraged. How do people trying to resolve human-monkey conflict convey these ideas, so that the heart and the mind are in agreement? Please come and share your thoughts and ideas so that we can coexist with one of our closest relatives.

 

About the Speaker: Dr. Paula Pebsworth is a Post-Doctoral Associate, Animal Behavior and Cognition Programme, NIAS. She completed her PhD from Kyoto University’s Primate Research Institute in Japan. Her areas of interest are resolution of human-animal conflict, self-medicative behavior, and spatial ecology. Currently she is studying the drivers of human primate conflict and mitigation strategies to reduce crop-raiding in rhesus macaques in Himachal Pradesh.

 

 

 

 

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For further info, please contact Sangeetha Menon [prajnanata@gmail.com or sangeetha.menon@nias.res.in] Coordinator of NIAS Wednesday Discussion Meetings

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Date: 
Wednesday, June 6, 2018